Tag Archive: New York


48 NYC shootings in a weekend: Trend or random tragedy?

It was a very bloody Labor Day weekend in New York. Forty-eight people were shot, including two law enforcement officers and a woman who was sitting with her daughter on a Brooklyn building stoop. The officers survived; three people have died.

The high number of shootings has captured headlines and led some to wonder whether there’s some specific explanation for the violence.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg says there is, and he said Tuesday that lawmakers in the nation’s capital ought to do something to better control gun violence. New York state reportedly had some of the strictest gun laws in the country, but Bloomberg wants Washington’s help. He spoke outside a hospital where the officers were being treated.

“This is a national problem requiring national leadership,” he said, according to the Los Angeles Times. “But at the moment, neither end of Pennsylvania Avenue has the courage to take basic steps that would save lives.”

Jon M. Shane, an assistant professor at one of America’s most highly regarded policing think tanks, the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York, cautioned against drawing any conclusions from the numbers alone. Shane spent 20 years with the police department in Newark, New Jersey, which has consistently ranked as one of the most violent cities in the United States.

“I would caution against chalking this up to violence that is going to happen over any holiday weekend,” Shane said, adding that thorough analysis of each Labor Day weekend shooting should be done to extrapolate concrete explanations that go beyond the particulars of each incident. One would need to research possible motives in each case and investigate suspects’ backgrounds and their possible criminal affiliations. Previous crimes at the locations should be weighed from every angle.

In short, 48 shootings sounds like a lot, but drawing any large conclusions, or linking them to a larger trend, will take time.

The woman and the officers were shot Monday hours after the West Indian American Day Parade ended in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. According to the New York Post, two men were “slap boxing” before a shootout in which police became involved. In all, nine people in the area of the parade were shot.

Several people were shot in the Bronx on Sunday. Some of the wounded were children. Four people were shot Monday in Flatbush, Brooklyn, one teenager fatally.

The weekend’s bloodshed put a fine point on figures the FBI released in Mayshowing that violent crime was down throughout the country in the past year but up in New York. The New York Police Department released its own report in January, available in full here (PDF), which visually lays out all of the city’s 536 homicides in 2010

Image: Chimney

 

ABBEVILLE, La. — The narrow, brick chimney of a Louisiana bank became his tomb for 27 years and now Joseph Schexnider will be laid to rest Sunday in a proper grave with a proper farewell by his family.

Image: Robert Schexnider

Abbeville Police Department  /  AP

Joseph Schexnider was briefly with the Louisiana National Guard.

Still, his brother Robert wonders, how did he wind up in that chimney? Didn’t anyone hear any cries for help? Was it a robbery attempt gone awry, an accident or something more sinister?

“At least we know where he is now,” Schexnider, 48, said, tears welling in his eyes ahead of his brother’s funeral and burial. “At least he’s home.”

Nearly three decades after he disappeared, much mystery lingers about the case of Joseph Schexnider and involving a small town bank in the southern Louisiana city of Abbeville. Police say Schexnider became trapped and apparently died in the bank’s chimney in 1984. But beyond that, they know little more.

“Everybody has an opinion,” said Lt. David Hardy, chief of investigations for the Abbeville Police Department. “But no one has evidence to say one way or another.

If Joseph Schexnider did cry out for help, no one heard his pleas. The stench of death was never detected.

The decades rolled on until last May when a construction worker helping turn the bank’s vacant second floor into offices tugged some fabric out of the chimney and was showered with old clothes and human bones.

Described as sweet-natured and relaxed by the few who remember him, Joseph Schexnider was 22 when his family last saw him in January 1984. He had no criminal record, but was wanted for possessing a stolen car.

A lanky, rambling man, Schexnider was prone to wandering at an early age.

In the years after they last saw them, his family, his mother, and two brothers and a sister, had not reported him missing — and no one searched for him.

“My mother worried about him, but I just said, ‘Mom, that’s just Joseph being Joseph,'” Robert Schexnider said. “He was always taking off for somewhere.”

Joseph first ran off around the age of 9 or 10, Robert recalled, adding his brother had dropped out of high school in the ninth grade.

He worked now and then at this and that, quitting jobs when he became tired and moving on. He was briefly in the Louisiana National Guard, leaving with a medical discharge. One of the few pictures of him shows him in uniform, his dark eyes looking off into the distance.

“He was always going off somewhere,” Robert Schexnider said. “He told me he’d seen every state in the country.”

Schexnider followed carnivals and once traveled with a circus. He told his brother he hawked cotton candy and peanuts with the shows, traveling with the circus to New York where he was stranded when it left to go overseas.

“He didn’t have enough money to get home, so the church helped him out,” recalled Francis Plaisance, a city councilman and the pastor of the church the Schexniders attended. “I remember him as being a nice kid.”

Plaisance also remembers Joseph as a somewhat simple person. When the church sent a plane ticket to New York for him to come home, Schexnider was unable to navigate the airport.

“We ended up having a pastor up there walking him through it and put him on the plane,” Plaisance said.

Jason Hebert, now a detective with Abbeville Police, went to elementary school with Joseph Schexnider. He described him as a quiet kid, on the fringe of a group of young boys that made mischief in the town.

“He was just another kid,” Hebert said. “Nothing really stood out about him.”

With the remains found in the chimney were a yellow long-sleeve shirt, a pair of jeans, blue tennis shoes, and jockey shorts with Schexnider’s name printed in the waistband. There also was a magazine and gloves.

He had a wallet with a copy of his birth certificate, a Social Security card and a few pictures.

“There was no sign of foul play,” Hardy said. But, he said, there is no way to determine the cause of death.

A DNA test confirmed his identity.

From the way the skeleton was recovered, Hardy said it appeared Schexnider went into the 14-inch-by-14-inch chimney feet first. Because the chimney narrowed sharply at the bottom, he then was apparently unable to maneuver his way back out.

Are we really proud of the George Daw precedent?

The New York state bus driver was fired Monday because he “endangered welfare of students he was transporting when he picked up three unauthorized passengers,” according to the Educational Bus Company on Long Island. But as transgressive as that statement makes Daw’s actions sound, what in fact happened was what would commonly be described as either an act of heroism or at the least a Good Samaritan in action. What Daw did was rescue three police officers who were stranded in a hailstorm on Aug. 1.

“I felt this was something anyone would do under the circumstances,” said Daw, 58, according to an NBC News report. The incident took place in New Hyde Park, just south of the Long Island Expressway. The passengers in Daw’s bus included a teenager and a bus matron. As he passed through the park, Daw noticed the unmarked police car flooding, with three passengers inside.

“They’re saying, ‘You’ve got to help us, you’ve got to help us,’ ” Daw told NBC. ” ‘You’ve got to get us to the third precinct. We’re police officers.’ “

So he took their cue, and brought the officers to their precinct. By the time he returned to his headquarters in Copiague, located in Long Island’s Nassau County, he was given his dismissal notice.

Laws protecting Good Samaritans can come in a variety of forms. New York state passed a version in July that prohibited arresting someone on a drug possession charge if that person was contacting police tohelp an overdose victim. Most commonly, the laws protect bystanders who come to the aid of an emergency but run the risk of contributing to injuries or a wrongful death. Indeed, New York is one state that has such aprotective statute for licensed dentists, physicians, nurses, physicians and physical therapists.

But in a case like Daw’s, the decision ultimately rests with his employer. New York state does have established wrongful termination laws, and Daw says that he is hoping to be reinstated. But he also says that he holds out little hope. When approached for comment about the incident by CBS News, Educational Bus had no comment.

David Wu officially resigns seat amid sex allegationsRep. David Wu of Oregon is mobbed by reporters on his way to a meeting of the House Democratic caucus earlier this week. Wu resigned his seat Wednesday.

Embattled Rep. David Wu had said he would leave office as soon as the debt-ceiling crisis was resolved. Wednesday night, the Oregon Democrat was true to his word, officially resigning as of 11:59 p.m.

Wu has been accused of an “unwanted” sexual encounter with the teenage daughter of a campaign donor. Unlike former Rep. Anthony Weiner of New York, Wu appeared to have no desire to drag his party through a scandal and once the allegations surfaced last week, he said he would soon depart.

Earlier this week, Oregon’s two Democratic senators, Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, turned up the heat, telling Wu after the president signed the debt-ceiling compromise bill to get on with the business of getting out.

“Serving as a U.S. Congressman has been the greatest honor of my life. There is no other job where you get up each day and ask, ‘How can I try to make the world a better place today?’” Wu said in a statement released by his office. “Particularly meaningful to me has been working for more and better investments in science and education. Also, I believe that my support for people who struggle for human rights and civil liberties will ultimately bear fruit in a world that is more just and peaceful.

“However great the honor and engaging the work, there comes a time to hand on the privilege of elected office—and that time has come,” he said.

A special election to replace Wu may not be held until early next year, with a primary likely coming in November.

Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times

 

5min.com

A New York man was forced to tread water for a whopping 18 hours in Lake Huron after his 2-seat Cessna plane crashed into the lake.

42-year-old Michael Trapp swam in Lake Huron without a life jacket for nearly a day as he “wasn’t ready to die yet,” the Associated Press reports.

The auto mechanic from Gouverneur, New York, left home on Tuesday to attend a family reunion in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. He decided to fly his own plane because a round-trip ticket cost $922. “I said: I can fly there and back for 400 bucks and I wanted to do it,” Trapp told reporters while recovering at a Saginaw hospital.

All was fine with the flight as he crossed over Canada, but the plane’s engine started to sputter over Michigan. He contacted flight officials in Lansing to tell them he was going down while the plane was at 3,000 feet, Trapp told local Fox affiliate WWNY. He crashed near Harbor Beach, 105 miles north of Detroit.

“I just kept struggling and struggling,” he said. He told reporters that he tried to use a credit card to reflect the sun to get the attention of nearby boats.

“It’s amazing what goes on in your mind when you’re laying in water and you look up at the skies and watch the shooting stars and watch meteorites go round. Gives you time to realize what’s important in life at that point,” Trapp told local New York station WWNY-TV while recovering.

Finally, at around 10:20am on Wednesday, Dean and Diane Petitpren, a couple from Grosse Pointe Farms near Detroit, saw him waving his sock in the water and took him aboard their yacht.

 

http://www.worldstarhiphop.com/videos/e/16711680/wshhxK7zR9lp9683EDQo
 

“Everyone was stunned after Isayah Muller, a promising young Truman High School football star, was stabbed to death just hours after his graduation on June 28, 2011. There was outrage after his father, Andre Muller, was arrested and charged with starting a fight, but the man who fatally stabbed Isayah was not arrested. The fight at a parking lot in the Bronx between was over a $200 bottle of cologne — a graduation gift that went missing from the family’s car. Police maintained Isayah’s dad was the aggressor. But some didn’t want to believe it. The video is from a surveillance camera inside the parking lot booth. 5 was asked to conceal the faces of the employees because their lives have allegedly been threatened. You can see the parking attendants speaking with Isayah’s father, Andre. He is standing at the entrance, had accused the employees of stealing the cologne. They talk, there is some gesturing, and things appear to escalate. The attendants even let Andre look inside their personal backpacks and search the drawers. ” – New York

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