Tag Archive: Indiana


Notre Dame Ufo 3

As thousands of Notre Dame football fans watched the Fighting Irish battling it out with the University of South Florida on Sept. 3, a fierce lightning storm approached the Indiana stadium, leading the crowd to evacuate. And while the game was in delay mode, many people caught sight of several unidentified flying objects darting around the lightning bolts in the sky.

Video captured bright orb-like objects as well as tube-shaped elongated ones circling in the sky above.

UFO aficionados have questions. Were the objects merely part of the storm as debris flying about in the wind? Balloons or birds caught in the ongoing turbulence and seen on video? Or were they alien gridiron fans looking to watch a big game from above while refueling their planet-hopping propulsion systems?

“Since it was at a stadium, it would be astonishing if there weren’t 20 videotapes of it,” said NBC News space consultant and UFO skeptic James Oberg. “In a case like this, you start out looking for other images and go from there.”

Oberg, a former NASA rocket scientist and author of numerous books, including “Star-Crossed Orbits: Inside the U.S.-Russian Space Alliance,” says there’s enough teasing behind UFO reports in general, “and I wish we could filter out the good stuff, but so far we haven’t.”

Another doubting eye on the Notre Dame reports comes from Robert Sheaffer, a longtime skeptical investigator of UFO claims.

“Unfortunately, there’s no way to tell how far the object is from the camera,” Sheaffer said. “You can clearly see the raindrops coming down, illuminated by the stadium lights. When the object’s apparent motion is fastest, it looks very much like the so-called ‘Roswell Rods‘ that Jose Escamilla has been promoting.

“The angular motion of the object is too fast for the video to capture it clearly. The frames are too slow, and so the object blurs and stretches out into a rod,” added Sheaffer, author of the new book “Psychic Vibrations: Skeptical Giggles From The Skeptical Inquirer.”

Oberg said the proliferation of digital cameras should make the identification process of UFOs easier these days.

“In a lightning storm, there’s always interesting, if bizarre, lightning phenomena, and you wish you had better documentation and multiple cameras and an ability to establish what particular origin that this kind of light would have,” he said. “With so many cameras out there now, it’s getting harder and harder to make excuses for the absence of corroborative photographs.”

WATCH THE NOTRE DAME UFO VIDEO:


Oberg’s skeptical colleague, Sheaffer, agrees that the evidence from Notre Dame is currently too scant to suggest extraterrestrial influence.

“I think that the [Notre Dame] object is a bit farther away than that. It could easily be a piece of wind-borne debris, maybe cardboard, spun around by the severe winds of the thunderstorm. It could also be a bird, frantically trying to make its way to safety,” he said. “Without distance information, we can’t say for sure what it is. There’s no reason to think that it represents any kind of alien activity.”

What do you think? Was this an ET visitation, storm-driven debris or insects flying very close to the camera? Send us a comment below.

By the way, USF beat Notre Dame, 23-20 — in case you’re keeping score.

Young people are being suspended, expelled and charged with criminal offenses for behavior as innocuous as doodling on a desk.

A few months back, 18-year-old Tyell Morton was enjoying his senior year at Rushville High in Indiana. Today, he faces the prospect of being labeled a felon for the rest of his life for a harmless senior prank.

Morton was arrested for putting a blowup doll in a bathroom stall on the last day of school.

He was caught when video footage showed a man entering the high school in a hooded sweatshirt and leaving a package in the bathroom. Fearing the package might be a bomb, school officials evacuated the premises and called the Indiana State bomb squad. Although no one was injured, no property damaged and no dangerous materials found, Morton, who had not been in any trouble prior to this incident, is being charged with disorderly conduct (a misdemeanor) and institutional criminal mischief (a class C felony), carrying the potential of two to eight years in prison.

Tyell Morton’s case has received nationwide media attention and there is even a website called Free Tyrell Morton. Unfortunately, his case is hardly the only one of its kind. The overzealous response to Morton’s harmless, albeit immature senior prank, is just the most recent in a long string of over-the-top punishments visited upon American students.

Young people are being suspended, expelled and charged with criminal offenses for behavior as innocuous as doodling on a desk.
A few months back, 18-year-old Tyell Morton was enjoying his senior year at Rushville High in Indiana. Today, he faces the prospect of being labeled a felon for the rest of his life for a harmless senior prank.

Morton was arrested for putting a blowup doll in a bathroom stall on the last day of school. He was caught when video footage showed a man entering the high school in a hooded sweatshirt and leaving a package in the bathroom. Fearing the package might be a bomb, school officials evacuated the premises and called the Indiana State bomb squad. Although no one was injured, no property damaged and no dangerous materials found, Morton, who had not been in any trouble prior to this incident, is being charged with disorderly conduct (a misdemeanor) and institutional criminal mischief (a class C felony), carrying the potential of two to eight years in prison.

Tyell Morton’s case has received nationwide media attention and there is even a website called Free Tyrell Morton. Unfortunately, his case is hardly the only one of its kind. The overzealous response to Morton’s harmless, albeit immature senior prank, is just the most recent in a long string of over-the-top punishments visited upon American students.

In Pearl, MississippiPearl High School’s rivalry with Brandon High School dates back to 1949. Last year, when big paw prints and the letters B H S were scribbled in bright red spray paint all over Pearl High’s new field house, Brandon High officials launched an investigation. Tyler Dearman and Adam Cook, both 17, were arrested at school and charged with felony malicious mischief.

Young people across America are being suspended, expelled and charged with criminal offenses for behavior as innocuous as doodling on a desk, skipping class, and in the case of Tyell Morton, participating in the well-established American tradition of “senior pranking.”  Suspension and expulsion are poles apart from arrests and criminal charges, but all of these disciplinary measures stem from a zero-tolerance culture that promotes harsh punishment for common childhood mistakes. Why is this happening?

‘Zero-Tolerance’

In cases of violent or dangerous behavior, most everyone can agree that suspension or expulsion may be required by law or necessary for the safety of other students and school staff. But the zero-tolerance culture that spread throughout the American school system following a string of highly publicized school shootings in the ’90s has had unintended consequences.

The rise of harsher discipline for student misconduct paralleled the “tough on crime” rhetoric of the late 1980s and early 1990s. This was further exacerbated by hysteria among legislators about out-of-control youth, fueled in part by frequent news stories of teachers and students being shot or killed in high school classrooms, hallways and cafeterias.

Panic over stories of youth violence led to the 1994 Guns-Free Schools Act, which allocated extra funding to local schools that could demonstrate that when a student brought a weapon to campus, he would be expelled for at least one year and referred to appropriate authorities in the justice system. But policymakers went far beyond this minimum standard, calling for stricter punishment for any disruptive or dangerous actions. While specific policies differ from state to state and even school to school, by 1997 at least 79 percent of schools nationwide had adopted zero-tolerance policies toward alcohol, drugs and violence. (Zero-tolerance describes policies that automatically impose severe discipline on students without regard to individual circumstances.)

A man identified as a Fort Wayne pastor and radio personality has been arrested on three charges of dealing cocaine.Fort Wayne police said the department had received several complaints about the Rev. Curtis White III selling cocaine, and the Vice and Narcotics Section investigated him for a month before making an arrest Friday.

According to a written statement, police served a warrant at White’s hotel room in the 4900 block of Bluffton Road and found 6.6 grams of crack cocaine in the room and 6.5 grams of crack cocaine“secreted in a body cavity of Mr. White.”

White has been Sunday morning host of the Gospel Train Unity Inspirational Hour on 102.9 The River, the station confirmed Monday. It said he paid for the time, and the payment was listed in connection with Divine Faith Baptist Church, 1433 McCulloch St.

 

Jen McCreight, a blogger who describes herself as “a liberal, geeky, nerdy, scientific, perverted atheist feminist trapped in Indiana,” has never been a fan of Barbie dolls, yet she was moved to action when she discovered that someone has created an Episcopal Priest Barbie. The Reverend Barbie doll, created by Julie Blake Fisher, an Episcopal priest in Kent, Ohio,  has her own Facebook page and comes dressed in thelatest trends in clergy-wear.
“Man,” wrote Jen in her Blag Hag blog, “why should religious people get to have all the fun? I want an atheist Barbie!” And so (with tongue stuck firmly in cheek) she made one.
Here’s one of Julie Fisher’s Reverend Barbie outfits to compare it with.
With all the positions and professions Barbie has modeled before, can anyone be surprised at these new ones?
Photo Credit:
1) Atheist Barbie (Jen McCreight)
2) Episcopal Priest Barbie (Rev. Julie Blake Fisher)

 

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